Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS)

Instructions/Activity:
Pelvic rest for 6 weeks. (No douching, tampons, or sexual intercourse.)
No vigorous exercise for 6 weeks.
If you have had a C-section, no heavy lifting greater than 10 lbs. For 6 weeks.
No driving for 1-2 weeks (if you have had a C-section) or while take Percocet.
If you have had a 4th degree tear, nothing in the rectum (suppositories, etc.) for 6 weeks.
Also, please use a stool softener for 2-3 weeks after your delivery, such as Colace (which is sold over the counter)
For C-section patients, keep your incision clean and dry. Let the water/soap run down on the incision in the shower. Do not apply soap on a towel and directly scrub your incision. Do not apply any creams/lotions/Neosporin to your incision. Your steri-strips may fall off on their own, otherwise we will inspect and/ or remove them at your 1-2 week appointment. 

Your next appointment should be:
~ In six weeks for a vaginal delivery, unless otherwise specified at the time of discharge.

~In 1-2 weeks, if you had a C-section, for an incision check. You will then have another appointment 4 weeks later for your 6 week post partum exam.

Call the office if you have...

Signs of mastitis including: reddened, hard, and exquisitely tender areas to the breast accompanied by a fever greater than 100.4.
Excessive vaginal bleeding greater than 1 soaked pad per hour. (You will have vaginal bleeding for 4-6 weeks after delivery. This may slightly increase 2-3 weeks after delivery, but will then taper off.)
An exquisitely tender abdomen accompanied by a fever greater than 100.4.
Any signs or symptoms of post partum depression.
For C- section patients
~ Any opening of your incision
~Any drainage from your incision that is excessive, or any pus coming from the incision.

Medications:
Percocet, 1-2 tablets every 4-6 hours as needed for pain.
Ibuprofen 600 mg every 6 hours as needed for pain.
For constipation: Colace, Milk of Magnesia
Continue your prenatal vitamins as long as you are breast feeding or for 30 days after delivery.
For hemorrhoids, use Tucks pads, Preparation H, Proctofoam as needed.
For cracked/sore nipples you may use Lanolin cream. 





Episiotomy and Laceration Care

“Sitz Baths” (simply sitting in a tub of warm water 15 minutes, 2-3 times per day) can help to relieve discomfort resulting from lacerations. Additionally, Tucks pads. Witch Hazel and Lanacaine, may be applied to the external vaginal area as needed. You may also use oral pain medications as described above. Stitches will dissolve in 1-6 weeks. You will be more comfortable if you are not constipated; please follow directions above to prevent/treat constipation.


Hemorrhoids

Sitz baths, as described above, can help alleviate hemorrhoid pain as well. You can aso use topical agents such as Tucks pads, Witch Hazel pads, or Preparation HC. Actively prevent constipation.

Reasons to Call Your Physician
Fever greater than 101
Cesarean incision that is red, draining or increasingly painful
Signs of a breast infection: red and painful area on your breast, especially if associated with fevers greater than 101 and/or flu-like symptoms
Foul- smelling vaginal discharge
excessive vaginal bleeding (see above section on vaginal bleeding)
Swollen, red, painful area on your leg
Chest pain
Persistenly painful urination or inability to urinate
Worsening vaginbal or rectal pain
Persistent headache not relieved with pain medication, changes in vision, and severe right sided painThe more you understand your body and how it functions, the better equipped you'll be at taking care of yourself to achieve optimal health. We've included the Patient Education section on our website to provide you with valuable, practical wellness information which you can incorporate into your lifestyle to improve the quality of your life. We hope you will turn to these pages whenever you have a question about health related issues and urge you to contact our practice at any time to make an appointment with one of our doctors. 

What is Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome?

Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome, or PCOS, is a common endocrine disorder affecting as many as 1 in 10 women of childbearing age, according to womenshealth.gov. PCOS is characterized by enlarged ovaries that contain follicles, or small collections of fluid, and it has been known to affect girls as young as 11 years old.

What Causes Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome?

While no one knows the exact cause of PCOS, doctors do know that the condition is caused by a hormonal imbalance. Factors such as heredity, excess weight, excess insulin, and inflammation can all play a role in causing the condition as well.

What are the Symptoms of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome?

PCOS is typically characterized by infrequent menstrual periods, infertility and an increase in male hormone production, which can cause excess facial hair growth, weight gain, adult acne and even male pattern baldness. PCOS is also sometimes accompanied by oily skin, dandruff, skin tags, pelvic pain, depression and sleep apnea as well.

What Treatments are Are Available for Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome?

If you are diagnosed with PCOS, your doctor will likely recommend that you eat a healthier diet (including fewer processed foods), that you exercise more and that you lose weight if you are overweight. These simple at-­home treatments can be effective in managing mild cases of PCOS. If your condition is more severe, your doctor may recommend certain medications, such as birth control pills, or surgery.

Health Risks Related to Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome

While missing periods and producing excess male hormones can be unpredictable, annoying and embarrassing, the health risks don't stop there. Women who have PCOS are also at a greater risk for diabetes, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, heart attack and depression. Pregnant women who have PCOS are also at an increased risk for gestational diabetes, premature delivery and miscarriage.

If you are experiencing irregular periods, infertility, weight gain or excessive hair growth, PCOS may be to blame. Speak to your doctor for more information, a diagnosis and a treatment plan today.