Hysterectomy

Instructions/Activity:
Pelvic rest for 6 weeks. (No douching, tampons, or sexual intercourse.)
No vigorous exercise for 6 weeks.
If you have had a C-section, no heavy lifting greater than 10 lbs. For 6 weeks.
No driving for 1-2 weeks (if you have had a C-section) or while take Percocet.
If you have had a 4th degree tear, nothing in the rectum (suppositories, etc.) for 6 weeks.
Also, please use a stool softener for 2-3 weeks after your delivery, such as Colace (which is sold over the counter)
For C-section patients, keep your incision clean and dry. Let the water/soap run down on the incision in the shower. Do not apply soap on a towel and directly scrub your incision. Do not apply any creams/lotions/Neosporin to your incision. Your steri-strips may fall off on their own, otherwise we will inspect and/ or remove them at your 1-2 week appointment. 

Your next appointment should be:
~ In six weeks for a vaginal delivery, unless otherwise specified at the time of discharge.

~In 1-2 weeks, if you had a C-section, for an incision check. You will then have another appointment 4 weeks later for your 6 week post partum exam.

Call the office if you have...

Signs of mastitis including: reddened, hard, and exquisitely tender areas to the breast accompanied by a fever greater than 100.4.
Excessive vaginal bleeding greater than 1 soaked pad per hour. (You will have vaginal bleeding for 4-6 weeks after delivery. This may slightly increase 2-3 weeks after delivery, but will then taper off.)
An exquisitely tender abdomen accompanied by a fever greater than 100.4.
Any signs or symptoms of post partum depression.
For C- section patients
~ Any opening of your incision
~Any drainage from your incision that is excessive, or any pus coming from the incision.

Medications:
Percocet, 1-2 tablets every 4-6 hours as needed for pain.
Ibuprofen 600 mg every 6 hours as needed for pain.
For constipation: Colace, Milk of Magnesia
Continue your prenatal vitamins as long as you are breast feeding or for 30 days after delivery.
For hemorrhoids, use Tucks pads, Preparation H, Proctofoam as needed.
For cracked/sore nipples you may use Lanolin cream. 





Episiotomy and Laceration Care

“Sitz Baths” (simply sitting in a tub of warm water 15 minutes, 2-3 times per day) can help to relieve discomfort resulting from lacerations. Additionally, Tucks pads. Witch Hazel and Lanacaine, may be applied to the external vaginal area as needed. You may also use oral pain medications as described above. Stitches will dissolve in 1-6 weeks. You will be more comfortable if you are not constipated; please follow directions above to prevent/treat constipation.


Hemorrhoids

Sitz baths, as described above, can help alleviate hemorrhoid pain as well. You can aso use topical agents such as Tucks pads, Witch Hazel pads, or Preparation HC. Actively prevent constipation.

Reasons to Call Your Physician
Fever greater than 101
Cesarean incision that is red, draining or increasingly painful
Signs of a breast infection: red and painful area on your breast, especially if associated with fevers greater than 101 and/or flu-like symptoms
Foul- smelling vaginal discharge
excessive vaginal bleeding (see above section on vaginal bleeding)
Swollen, red, painful area on your leg
Chest pain
Persistenly painful urination or inability to urinate
Worsening vaginbal or rectal pain
Persistent headache not relieved with pain medication, changes in vision, and severe right sided painThe more you understand your body and how it functions, the better equipped you'll be at taking care of yourself to achieve optimal health. We've included the Patient Education section on our website to provide you with valuable, practical wellness information which you can incorporate into your lifestyle to improve the quality of your life. We hope you will turn to these pages whenever you have a question about health related issues and urge you to contact our practice at any time to make an appointment with one of our doctors. 

A hysterectomy is a medical procedure in which all or part of a woman's uterus is removed. A woman's ovaries and Fallopian tubes may also be removed at the same time, depending on the reason for the hysterectomy.

When is a Hysterectomy Needed?

A hysterectomy can be used to treat a number of problems or conditions. For example, a hysterectomy can be used to treat uterine fibroids, endometriosis, chronic pelvic pain and adenomyosis. It can remedy uterine prolapse, cancer of the uterus and unusually heavy bleeding. Because of its invasive and non­-reversible nature, however, a hysterectomy is typically only done when absolutely necessary. You will need to speak to your doctor about your options to find out if a hysterectomy is the best option or you.

How is a Hysterectomy Performed?

A hysterectomy can be performed several ways. In an abdominal hysterectomy, the doctor will remove the uterus by making an incision in the abdomen. In a laparoscopic hysterectomy, the entire surgery is done using only small incisions for a faster healing time.

What Risk Factors are Associated with a Hysterectomy?

Most women who have a hysterectomy suffer no serious complications as a result. Women who do suffer complications are more likely to have vaginal prolapse, chronic pain, blood clots, fistula formation, urinary incontinence or hemorrhage.

One unavoidable side effect of a hysterectomy in young women and women of childbearing age is that it eliminates the possibility of becoming pregnant, and sends them into menopause instead. For this reason, many doctors hesitate to perform a hysterectomy on a young woman unless it is medically necessary, even if she thinks she is probably done having children. A hysterectomy is not reversible later if she should change her mind.

If you are currently suffering from a condition for which a hysterectomy is a known cure, talk to your doctor about your treatment options today.