Ovarian Cysts

Instructions/Activity:
Pelvic rest for 6 weeks. (No douching, tampons, or sexual intercourse.)
No vigorous exercise for 6 weeks.
If you have had a C-section, no heavy lifting greater than 10 lbs. For 6 weeks.
No driving for 1-2 weeks (if you have had a C-section) or while take Percocet.
If you have had a 4th degree tear, nothing in the rectum (suppositories, etc.) for 6 weeks.
Also, please use a stool softener for 2-3 weeks after your delivery, such as Colace (which is sold over the counter)
For C-section patients, keep your incision clean and dry. Let the water/soap run down on the incision in the shower. Do not apply soap on a towel and directly scrub your incision. Do not apply any creams/lotions/Neosporin to your incision. Your steri-strips may fall off on their own, otherwise we will inspect and/ or remove them at your 1-2 week appointment. 

Your next appointment should be:
~ In six weeks for a vaginal delivery, unless otherwise specified at the time of discharge.

~In 1-2 weeks, if you had a C-section, for an incision check. You will then have another appointment 4 weeks later for your 6 week post partum exam.

Call the office if you have...

Signs of mastitis including: reddened, hard, and exquisitely tender areas to the breast accompanied by a fever greater than 100.4.
Excessive vaginal bleeding greater than 1 soaked pad per hour. (You will have vaginal bleeding for 4-6 weeks after delivery. This may slightly increase 2-3 weeks after delivery, but will then taper off.)
An exquisitely tender abdomen accompanied by a fever greater than 100.4.
Any signs or symptoms of post partum depression.
For C- section patients
~ Any opening of your incision
~Any drainage from your incision that is excessive, or any pus coming from the incision.

Medications:
Percocet, 1-2 tablets every 4-6 hours as needed for pain.
Ibuprofen 600 mg every 6 hours as needed for pain.
For constipation: Colace, Milk of Magnesia
Continue your prenatal vitamins as long as you are breast feeding or for 30 days after delivery.
For hemorrhoids, use Tucks pads, Preparation H, Proctofoam as needed.
For cracked/sore nipples you may use Lanolin cream. 





Episiotomy and Laceration Care

“Sitz Baths” (simply sitting in a tub of warm water 15 minutes, 2-3 times per day) can help to relieve discomfort resulting from lacerations. Additionally, Tucks pads. Witch Hazel and Lanacaine, may be applied to the external vaginal area as needed. You may also use oral pain medications as described above. Stitches will dissolve in 1-6 weeks. You will be more comfortable if you are not constipated; please follow directions above to prevent/treat constipation.


Hemorrhoids

Sitz baths, as described above, can help alleviate hemorrhoid pain as well. You can aso use topical agents such as Tucks pads, Witch Hazel pads, or Preparation HC. Actively prevent constipation.

Reasons to Call Your Physician
Fever greater than 101
Cesarean incision that is red, draining or increasingly painful
Signs of a breast infection: red and painful area on your breast, especially if associated with fevers greater than 101 and/or flu-like symptoms
Foul- smelling vaginal discharge
excessive vaginal bleeding (see above section on vaginal bleeding)
Swollen, red, painful area on your leg
Chest pain
Persistenly painful urination or inability to urinate
Worsening vaginbal or rectal pain
Persistent headache not relieved with pain medication, changes in vision, and severe right sided painThe more you understand your body and how it functions, the better equipped you'll be at taking care of yourself to achieve optimal health. We've included the Patient Education section on our website to provide you with valuable, practical wellness information which you can incorporate into your lifestyle to improve the quality of your life. We hope you will turn to these pages whenever you have a question about health related issues and urge you to contact our practice at any time to make an appointment with one of our doctors. 

What are Ovarian Cysts?

Ovarian cysts are pockets of fluid that form on the surface of a woman's ovary. Ovarian cysts are very common, and most women have one away on their own without treatment.

Symptoms

Ovarian cysts do not always cause symptoms. When they do, the symptoms can include loss of appetite, nausea, weight gain, frequent urination, breast tenderness or a feeling of heaviness in the abdomen. They may also cause pain, particularly pelvic pain shortly before or after a period, during intercourse or during bowel movements.

Call the doctor right away if your pain is accompanied by fever or vomiting, if your abdominal pain is sudden and severe, or if you have cold, clammy skin, lightheadedness or rapid breathing, as these are all signs of a medical emergency.

Types of Ovarian Cysts

Ovarian cysts are typically classified into various types based on their sources and causes. Functional cysts, for example, form during ovulation when an egg is not properly released from the follicle. Dermoid cysts form from cells that produce human eggs and may contain human tissue, teeth or hair. Endometriomas develop when uterine endometrial cells attach to an ovary and form a growth. Cystadenomas develop from ovarian tissue.

Ovarian Cyst Treatment Options

The most common treatment option for ovarian cysts is simply to wait and see. Since most cysts are not harmful and they tend to go away on their own within a few cycles, more invasive measures are generally not needed. Alternately, some doctors will prescribe birth control pill, which can inhibit the growth and formation of new ovarian cysts.

If these less invasive treatment methods do not prove effective, more invasive measures will be needed. Other, more invasive, treatment options for ovarian cysts do include surgery. These generally are not used unless the cysts are causing problems or refuse to go away on their own, however.